BEACH BENEFITS FOR SENIORS – recharging old people!!

We have been coming to Indian Rocks Beach, Florida for several years. Initially we rented a place a few blocks from the beach, but still walkable. For the last three years we have rented a place right on the beach, with a view of the water.

We rent a car, even though there is pretty good public transportation.

We have a  routine.

Watching the sea, especially in the evening when the sun goes down, is very relaxing. We come in September, after Labor Day,  because it is cheaper, there are fewer people, and we can watch the changes in the weather. Twice, we have been delayed as we followed the hurricanes in.

Hurricanes are scary, but interesting; not only for the changes in the weather, but to watch the destructiveness of the wind and water and the foolishness of people caught up in hurricanes; pre, during and post hurricane.

We fly into Tampa, rent a car at the airport through Costco, and try to find our way out of the airport complex – if you are old and they change the rental car locations, you are glad you come and go on a Saturday, when there was less traffic. There is a 4 story escalator, which didn’t bother you at 50, but which gets your attention at 78. Then a 10 minute train ride to all of the rental agencies and the huge indoor rental car garage.

The beach is a relief and calming. We have a balcony overlooking the water, an indoor well-lit garage for your car,  and an elevator.

The beach is swept every morning, the sand is white, This year there was a red tide problem, but except for a couple of days of dead fish on the beach, didn’t bother us.

September can be a problem.  It is the month for construction work and repairs, some restaurants are closed, hurricanes can be a problem, and this year the red tide lasted longer than usual. However; in September it is low season so rates are cheaper, traffic is reduced, no problem finding seats in restaurants, no crowds, no spring breaks, changing weather and cooler weather. If you are old, September is the month for you. The whole atmosphere is recharging.

Walking a couple of miles a day on the beach in the early morning is a benefit. Walking to Crabby Bills for breakfast is great. The breakfast is cheap, filling and interesting. Nothing like TV’s broadcasting football games from who knows where at 8 in the morning – the  bar also operates at 8 – you can eat outside. It is not crowded and the wait-staff is friendly.

There are numerous book boxes where you can take a book and leave a book. The Largo Library has a genealogy section and there is an Indian Rocks Library with computers, papers, magazines and books for sale.

At night you can walk to a few restaurants including Guppy’s, where you can share a plate and eat octopus.

If you are old, you want to be able to walk if you are going to have wine. News articles about seniors who have accidents always say “an elderly man was driving…” Can you imagine being in the drunk tank at 78? or, trying to walk a straight line, even if you could hear the cop’s directions??

The bottom line is that time spent watching the sea is recharging; especially if you are old. It is a nice rhythm.

Check it out!

THINK OLD!

 


VACATION RENTALS – A guide for seniors – more than you wanted to know!

Condo Maintenance Work in September!

  1. Use a reliable rental agent; such as Airbnb.com or VRBO.com.
  2. Look at the pictures and read the reviews on the web page.
  3. Determine if you can cancel and the penalties.
  4. Why are you going to this particular place? Beach? Skiing?  Museums? Family?
  5. Read the contract.
  6. Take dated cell phone pictures.
  7. Look for problems; especially old people problems – stairs, rugs, anything that could lead to a fall. Remember the public lights that guide you may also shine in your bedroom window. Construction may start at 8 in the morning. Remember, a beach condo is probably not designed, or furnished, for old people!
  8. Check all light bulbs – enough light to read by.
  9. Check, and pitch, food left in refrigerator, or stored.
  10. Batteries in tv clickers – take spares – I have had battery problems in the last three places I have rented. And, the battery was always the last thing I checked and in each case, fresh batteries made the clicker work. Usually, but not always, there are buttons on the TV – BUT, old people are addicted to clickers and don’t like to get up and walk over to the TV to change the channel.
  11. Locate instructions for all appliances.
  12. TVs and electronic devices are probably designed for someone 60 years younger than you. Best to bring a grand-kid with you, if you anticipate TV, computer or cell phone problems.
  13. Is there construction work taking place? In Indian Rocks Beach, FL, construction work takes place in September – See photo above.
  14. Are there cleaning supplies?
  15. Toilet paper, dishwasher soap, laundry soap? The owner, previous tenant, cleaning company all use different brands than you do. Get over it! Adapt!
  16. Sheets, towels, dishes, etc.?
  17. Parking spaces and car tags?
  18. Heating and air conditioning?
  19. Name and cell phone number of contact person for problems – ie lock box doesn’t work late at night when you arrive and you can’t figure out how to get in the unit.
  20. Deadlines for leaving – ie cleaning crew has to come in.
  21. Restaurant  guides – can you walk there?
  22. Public transportation, if you need it.
  23. Uber or Lyft available?
  24. Shopping?
  25. Light from glass brick walls, windows without shades, or from public areas?
  26. Read the book of comments.
  27. Communicate by e-mail so that you have a record.
  28. Insurance – damage, illness, death, cancellation for any reason?
  29. Seasons – On Florida beaches, September is the time to repair in anticipation of the high season, it is also hurricane season and low season – you probably got a good price, but you may have to put up with closed businesses, construction work, bad weather, air plane cancellations/delays, etc. SPRING BREAK – NOT A TIME FOR OLD PEOPLE  – Think about it!
  30. Red Tide or other natural or man-made disasters.  – Have you gone swimming in the ocean since you turned 70? Who is responsible?
  31. Why did you pick the place? low season, cost, hurricane, knew the area???
  32. What was disclosed?
  33. Don’t forget that your i-phone is a flashlight?
  34. Is there a library near by? newspapers, computers, books for sale cheap, information on local events, museums, etc.
  35. Hospitals, CVS clinics available? – Can your local pharmacy send meds to an out-of-state pharmacy? Old people must have their meds – lack of meds will panic an old person quicker than anything else.
  36. What do you do if you can’t make the TV work?
  37. Old people tend to make mountains out of mole hills on vacation; instead of adapting and enjoying.

What you can do!

  1. Call contact person.
  2. Notify VRBO.com or Airbnb.com.
  3. E-mail, so that there is a record.
  4. Photos
  5. IS  THE PERCEIVED PROBLEM WORTH THE EFFORT? YOU DIDN’T COME ON A VACATION TO MOVE TO A NEW UNIT, TO COMPLAIN, OR TO SPEND YOUR TIME RUNNING AROUND. WHY DEAL WITH WHAT IS REALLY NOT A PROBLEM – AND PROBABLY JUST A NUISANCE.
  6. You are not here to litigate, but to enjoy yourself.

After three weeks!

 

THINK OLD!  Especially when you are on vacation.


A BAKER’S DOZEN OF THINGS THAT SENIORS LIKE IN A RESTAURANT!

We are retired and eat out frequently; especially when on vacation in Florida. I got to thinking about what I liked in restaurants, given my age of 78. I like small French, Mexican, Italian and Chinese restaurants. I like table cloths, cloth napkins and water. I also realize that I am inconsistent, so you should take this list of a baker’s dozen with a grain of salt. Trust but verify, a senior’s mantra!

  1. Quiet – The app Soundprint registers noise in restaurants. I, like many old people, am deaf and it is hard to hear in a crowded restaurant where the tables are close together or where you are seated near a large group of people.
  2. Share a plate  – We don’t eat as much, so if we can share a plate, even for an extra charge, that is great.
  3. Smaller portions – We don’t need huge portions, or all you can eat buffets.
  4. Water – some of us drink a lot of water, and I, at least, judge a waiter by whether or not my water-glass is kept full.
  5. Parking – easy access and spaces wide enough to get in and out of the car with ease.
  6. Uber or Lyft – Uber or Lyft is great for old people. They are fast, convenient and allow us to have a glass of wine, without worrying about drunk driving. Nothing like a newspaper article that describes me as “elderly.”
  7. Enough light to read the menu – Not only am I deaf, but I have trouble seeing in dim light.  My i-Phone, with its built-in flashlight, has been a boon to my old age. Until you are old, you don’t realize how hard it can be to see in dim light.
  8. Simple choices – My mind is not as quick as it used to be, so the fewer, easier, and simpler choices, the happier I am.
  9. Doggy bags – if we can’t or don’t share a plate, a container to take half of our food home is great; even if we don’t have a dog.
  10. Non-fried preparation – Digestion can be a problem; and, of course I am very conscious of the life expectancy tables. I like to keep my options open.
  11. Easy access  – I need to get to my table and to the men’s room. Stairs, rugs, close tables, servers, folding tray tables, and using the hall to the men’s room for storage can lead to falls and always makes me nervous. Remember, falls are the leading cause of …….. for seniors.
  12. Bargain – a price I think is fair,
  13. Non-processed food – Too much food today is processed – at my age not only do I not need it, it is bad for me.

One French restaurant that I like is Chez Colette’s in Belleair Bluffs, Florida, which meets all my criteria.

 

THINK OLD!


A WALK ON THE BEACH AND BREAKFAST FOR THE geezer!

Walking on the beach and breakfast at Crabby Bill’s in Indian Rocks Beach, Florida.

I was raised in the mid-west and have lived in New Mexico for over 50 years, so the beach has always drawn me.

My wife’s family lived in Largo, Florida and Indian Rocks Beach has been a place she has been familiar with for over 50 years.The attraction has rubbed off on me.

Our life there is simple. We rent a condo overlooking the beach, we rent a car through Costco, we use Uber, we go to the library and frequent consignment stores. We have wi-fi. Good restaurants are within walking distance.

My interest in genealogy leads me to the Pinellas County Genealogy Society which has regular meetings and lots of sources.  It is located on the second floor of the Largo library.

My morning routine is what makes my day. I wake-up early and walk a mile and a half on the beach to Crabby Bill’s, a restaurant/bar that awakens at 7:00 AM. It is simple, indoors and outdoors, and caters to different customers depending on the time of the day. At 8:00 AM there is a smaller more mature crowd. At noon and in the evening they serve great fresh fish and beer at long communal tables.

Prior to breakfast is a stop at the CVS Pharmacy next door for the New York Times,  a habit I have even in New Mexico. (Today, the first time in years, they didn’t know what I was talking about when I asked for the NY Times.)

As an aside, since old people always have something wrong with them, don’t forget that CVS Pharmacies have a “Minute Clinic.” They can handle all sorts of minor health problems; and, if nothing else triage you and get  you more help if needed. You can get a place in line on-line, but I have always found them to be quick, helpful and professional. Why go to an emergency room unless it is an emergency?

I read the times while eating the All American Special with crisp bacon for $6.00. I  then walk a mile and a half back to the condo; hopefully with a new blog topic.

Fresh air, great breakfast and the news by 9:00. What could be better?

THINK OLD!

 

 


DUMMIES BOOKS, SOURCES FOR SENIORS!

Old people need to learn new things. And, at your age, all your mentors are dead. The problem is finding someone to teach you and having the guts to go and learn something. It is an uphill battle to admit at 78 that you are ignorant and don’t know everything. Old people are afraid of being wrong, stupid or foolish.

I suggest that if you want to learn something new that you start with a “Dummies” book. There are hundred of them and they cover everything from Dating after Age 50 to Beekeeping. Some of them are 20 years old, but most basic knowledge is also old and you can use a Dummies book as a starting point.

At least you won’t feel quite as foolish after you have looked through a “Dummies” book.

Note that there are a number of Dummies Books directed at Seniors, or of topics of interest to seniors; even  topics that you might not want anyone to know you are interested in, such as Alzheimer’s and Dementia for Dummies, which you  can order on Amazon.com. Get the Kindle edition, as you don’t want to leave it laying around, and it is cheaper.

When you are ready to buy, go to Amazon, which sells hundreds of “Dummies” books. Just search “Dummies + topic” and see what you get; or do the same thing at your local library.

Amazon should be your starting point. It is better than a card catalog, or the electronic equivalent. Then check your library; or if on vacation, the library in the town you are visiting. They usually have a  good supply and it is free. Besides, going to the library is interesting anyway as they have numerous magazines, programs, cafes, etc. They also are frequently the location for the local genealogy society, and other interest groups.

For example, we go to Indian Rocks Beach, Florida each year. Except for White Sands, New Mexico has a shortage of beaches. We like the Largo Public Library in Largo, Florida which provides us with a book store, a cafe, genealogy courses, genealogy library and dozens of magazines in addition to a huge number of books for “Dummies.”

Some of the Dummies Books I found at the Largo Public Library of interest to old people, deal with laptops, tablets and smart phones, Facebook, fit over 40, social security, estate planning, genealogy, personal finance, dating after 50, and dementia.

Of special interest to those of you who are downsizing, maybe in anticipation of a move to “The Home” is: e-Bay for DummiesOr, you might just want to buy a copy for your kids. Time to sell off all that junk, which no one in your family really wants.

You might be interested in:

And, of course, if you are an old blogger, there is always:

At my age, nothing could be more interesting than the 4th Edition of Beekeeping for Dummies.

THINK OLD!


GEEZER FACES OLD AGE – hanging on…

NO COMMENT!


ADJUSTING TO NEW SURROUNDINGS – traveling while old!

 

One of the hardest things for old people to do is to adjust to new surroundings. Especially if they involve internet technology, which means anything from an extension cord to a toaster and beyond. Everything is too complex for me. I can still remember when our phone number was Black 200 and we were on a party line. I could pick up the phone and ask the operator if she knew where my grandmother was.

Today, it is way too complex. For example:

We rented a condo in Florida, which is also rented to families with kids. I was faced with

The TV system which included three large TVs, a CD player, another player, cable, regular TV, and of course, NO  radio. 

SINCE I WROTE THIS, AND AFTER HAVING TROUBLE MAKING THE TVs WORK, I DISCOVERED, BY ACCIDENT, OR DUE TO MY AGE, THAT 3 OF THE CLICKERS DID NOT HAVE BATTERIES AND IN ONE, THE BATTERIES WERE DEAD. AFTER A TRIP TO THE DRUG STORE  FOR NEW BATTERIES, THE CLICKERS WORKED AND I WAS ABLE TO MAKE ALL THE TVs WORK.  I THINK THAT THIS SAYS SOMETHING ABOUT MY AGE. MY GRANDSON WOULD HAVE FIGURED IT OUT IN A MINUTE. (9/29/18)

Some of them you have to subscribe to. Some only work in conjunction with other systems. Some don’t seem to work. The TV in the living room does not get CNN, so we had to move to one of the two bedrooms to watch CNN.

Then you have to hook up to the internet, which means a series of numbers, letters and signs typed into a small key pad that you can’t see using old fingers that either hit the wrong key or two keys at the same time.

And, I forgot to mention the key lock box at the front door. It was set low and hard to see in the dark. It had little number that were not the size of my fingers. But, we got it done.

Where are my grandkids when I need them.

The closets were packed with beach paraphernalia, so, of course there was no storage space. Stepping over inflated, but non-deflatable, large toy inner tubes may be hazardous to my health. But, it ended up on top of the huge TV which was on top of a large cabinet which was in our bedroom and which got CNN.

There were several toasters, 4 coffee pots and the usual assortment of pots, pans, dishes, etc collected over the years reflecting the status as an AirBnb site.

The lights and fans (3 of them) were controlled by at least 2, and sometimes 3 switches each. 

There were rules, of course. The one I liked the best said: “no hanging towels over the railing on the porch.” The best part was that there was a clothes drying rack ii the corner of the porch. My kind of place.

All in all, it is a nice place, but we are just in the first 24 hours, which is adjustment time. We have 27 days to go, along with the remedial construction on the building, since this is the off-season, and it is our third year in this building. At our age, we are afraid to try anything new and the off-season is cheap and more interesting than the rest of the year.

I come from Kansas, and tornadoes, so hurricanes interest me – sick, I know, but am still fascinated by the sea, the clouds and the storms.

THINK OLD!


EXERCISE AT THE YMCA – ANYWHERE – An essential part of elder travel!

Traveling for long periods of time, or staying in one new place for a period of time, requires a routine if you are old. A necessary part of that routine is exercise. The YMCA, the club of our childhood, provides the setting.

The YMCA is available nation-wide,  is usually open for long hours, has skilled instructors, and a variety of programs. If you are old,it can be free.

The trick is to have a Silver Sneakers membership through your insurance plan. Free at home means free at most any place you travel in the US, and if you are visiting children and grandchildren, you need some place to go and something to do during the day. The Y provides that; without worrying about walking on strange and often busy streets. Exercise is the key to successful aging.

The best bet is an insurance-paid Silver Sneakers plan. This is good nation-wide at YMCAs and many health clubs. You have no excuse.

If you belong to a YMCA in your hometown, either through Silver Sneakers or with a paid membership, you can ask to have your name put on the Nationwide Membership List, which can be accessed by any YMCA in the country.

If you don’t have an insurance-paid plan, you can always pay a small fee to use the Y. It  depends on the place, but most of them seem to have fee schedules topping out at  about $75 per month. The schedules also seem to only go to age “64 and under,” so as an old person, it may be  free anyway.

We are in Florida, for a month and checked into the Clearwater, FL YMCA. We were on the Nationwide Membership list, courtesy of the Albuquerque YMCA,  which meant that we had a home YMCA and were eligible to  use other facilities; however in Clearwater, it was limited to a max of 24 days, and the Y suggested we use our Silver Sneakers membership, giving us  unlimited use of all facilities and access to all classes. 

The Clearwater Y is a new and modern facility and has every class you could imagine, including Silver Sneakers exercise, chair exercise, yoga, pilates, Tai Chi,  etc. In addition, there is a pool, a hot tub, basketball court, a complete weight room and every sort of exercise machine.

If you don’t believe me, check out the Clearwater Y.

It also provides numerous trips to local restaurants for lunch, other events, and classes on topics that should be of interest to old people.

If you want to go outdoors, there is a 1/4 mile walking/running track, but if you come from New Mexico, it is better to walk on the beach, which is also free.

Trainers are available  for a reasonable fee.

Sources:

Nationwide-membership in the YMCA

SILVER SNEAKERS

Clearwater, Florida YMCA

THINK OLD!


LEAVING THE GROUND IN NEW MEXICO – the sky’s the limit!

New Mexico is the place to go if you want to get off the ground. Last week-end we went to the glider field at the Moriarty Airport,  50 miles from Albuquerque. There we saw dozens of gliders and several tow planes. A 15 minute glider ride from Sundance Aviation costs $105 and you fly with an FAA approved, experienced pilot. The only downside is that you have to weigh less than 220 pounds and be under 6′ 5″.

 

Near by is the US Southwest Soaring Museum which unfortunately was closed on Sundays.

Naturally this got me to thinking, and I discovered over Albuquerque via Google:

Trike Flights –  This is an air tricycle. You can get a 30 minute ride for $100 with a licensed Sport Pilot. For an additional fee you can have a video made showing you in flight. I frequently see these mechanical trikes while I am walking along the Rio Grande.

Plane rides at Vertical Lift Aviation.

Helecopter Rides.

Parachute jumping. Starting at $375 with Albuquerque Sky Diving.

Hang gliding with High Desert Hang Gliding.

All near or in Albuquerque and while I have only taken a balloon ride, the others have intrigued me. I have not taken any but the hot air balloon ride, an Albuquerque must, but am intrigued at 77 and sorry that I missed them earlier in my life. I am toying with the glider ride.

More my speed is the Sandia Peak Ski & Tramway which will take you on a 2.7 mile tram ride to the top of Sandia Peak from Albuquerque. There is sking, a restaurant and great hiking. At your age, watch the altitude which is over 11,000 feet. You can always sit in the restaurant and enjoy the view with a glass of wine.

The big draw in and over Albuquerque is the Albuquerque Balloon Fiesta held for a week every October, where up to a 1000 balloons participate in a mass ascension, among other events. And of course, there are hot air balloon rides then and the year around. The traffic is horrible, but if you have an RV, there is great RV parking next to the grounds. Balloon pilots and their chase crews are hard to keep up with at my age, especially in the evening.

There is also the Anderson Abruzzo International Balloon Foundation Museum.

Most mornings I can see hot air balloons following the Rio Grande River behind my home, which is about my speed.

It is worth soaring  above the New Mexico desert, there is no age limit, and it gives you some great stories and pictures to impress your grandkids with.

THINK OLD!


SONORAN HOT DOGS IN TUCSON!

I have been coming to Tucson for over twenty years and have never tried a Sonoran Hot Dog. Recently I have been reading Anthony Bourdain’s books, Kitchen Confidential and The Nasty Bits, in which he advocates seeking out the authentic cooking of the place you are visiting.

Today, I went on Yelp after searching for the best Sonoran Hot Dogs in Tucson and came up with El Sinaloense, a hot dog cart that is permanently parked on North Alvernon.

It was raining, unusual in Tucson, but we parked behind the cart and the tent that covered it and ordered our hot dogs with everything.  It was one of the best hot dogs that I have ever eaten; even better than those at The Dog House in Albuquerque, of Breaking Bad fame.

Two hot dogs, two drinks came to $6. We ate in at picnic tables. There was one cook who turned out hot dogs in minutes, complete with hot peppers.

The hot dog wrapped in bacon and in a special bun has onions, tomatoes, salsa, mayo, mustard and cheese. The Sonoran Hot Dog is unique to Tucson with over 200 places serving them; mostly from carts or food trucks parked in vacant lots. I have discovered a few in Albuquerque, but have not tried them yet.

Well worth the trip. Now, every time we come to Tucson, a Sonoran Hot Dog will be on the menu.

To find a Sonoran Hot Dog near you: Google   “Sonoran Hot Dog”+ name of your town. or, if you live out of the Southwest, Google   “Sonoran Hot Dog”+recipe, and make your own.

And, of course, mine turned out:

 

 

THINK OLD!