A DOZEN VACATION FOOD IDEAS FOR SENIORS!

You are traveling; and, of course you have to eat. Mostly it is too expensive and probably not good for you; but, at your age who cares?

I am interested in places and ideas for eating well but frugally. This means getting the most for your money, having a new experience and maybe meeting new people. And, as always, you may have a story to tell. No one is interested if you ate at a chain; however, going to a church supper in a small NM town will give you a story to tell.

Share a plate. Old people eat less.  Most places will let you do it, though some charge an extra $3 or so. Always split a desert.

I have tried the following:

1. Eat at Whole Foods or other gourmet grocery store. You get good food in reasonable quantities and can eat it in the store or take it with you. You will also feel good since it is organic, humanly raised and free of additives. Your grandchildren will love it.

2. Try a university. Parking may be a problem; however, they usually have salad bars and other interesting menu items. Sometimes you can even get a beer or glass of wine.

3. Hospitals have gotten better, at least in their cafeterias. I can remember when  it was all fried, but now they have salad bars and other items that reflect their “dedication” to health. Don’t stay too long as you might catch something; they are places to avoid except for a quick meal.

4. Frequently, you can visit an assisted living facility and in exchange for listening to the sales pitch, get a free meal. This would be my last resort in most cases, having seen some of the food.

5. Some chains have reasonably priced healthy food. If you see a Chipotle or a Subway, stop. Two of you can share a burrito or a 12 in. sub, for about $6 to $8.

6. Picnic. Stop at a store and buy what you need for a picnic. Remember that left-overs may be a problem.

7. Frequent bed and breakfasts. Have a big breakfast, an apple for lunch, and a nice dinner with a glass of wine.

8. Service clubs, if you are a member. Watch for signs giving the day and place as you enter a town; or, go on-line.

9. If you belong to a private club, golf club, health club, or tennis club, check them out for reciprocity. Usually they can arrange for you to be a guest and use the facilities in another town. There will probably be a small fee.

10. Church suppers are always interesting; especially in small rural towns.

11. Small town events can give you interesting food.Try the Ramp Festival in Cullowhee, NC; or the matanza in Belen, NM where you can eat outside your comfort zone.

12. Never forget museums; especially if you are in Europe. Some of the best food I have had has been at museums in Madrid, Vienna and London. The same applies to US museums. At least look at them.

Pick up small town papers. Visit your old home towns. Use the internet. Try something new. Check out small town chambers of commerce. Explore.

THINK OLD!

 


DOES THE geezer NEED A NURSING STUDENT?

I live in a home with three bedrooms. At some point I will need care; especially if I elect to live-in-place. I need a cheap solution; especially at night. Someone to allay my fears of the dark and to answer the phone, the door and generally be a human presence.

A caregiver who is really just an elder-sitter would cost me $20 per hour or $240 a night and I would be asleep. That comes to $87,600 per year; a bit much given my social security of $1600 per month and no pension.

My solution is a student nurse. She can make aging in place workable.

Average student loan debt for graduating nurses is $30,000. The average cost of board and room at UNM for a student nurse is $8580 per school year. This does not include non-academic periods. For three years rooming at the geezer’s, this would be a savings of $25,740; not counting the non-school year times.

I spoke informally to a lady at the UNM nursing school  and to a fourth year student nurse, both of whom said it was possible to provide a nursing student with board and room in exchange for staying overnight at my house.

The student would live in one of my empty rooms, use the spare bathroom, eat the food from my “ice box” and check up on me, calling 911 as necessary.

She would be free during the day for classes; could have a boy/girl friend stay over, and could cut her student loans by at least $25,000.

She could do a paper on practical geriatrics for her geriatric course. She could study me, bring fellow students/professors around; and could generally get academic mileage out of her stay with me. I could be the guinea pig for geriatric research programs.

I could visit my kids during exams; and, we could work out something for periods when she had to be away.

She would have enough expertise; more than an elder-sitter; and, would know what to do in an emergency.

She would be better trained and vetted than the usual care-giver. I am afraid that someone is going to scam me or that a care-giver is going to steal my valuables and medicines. A nursing student has a career to lose if she does something unethical or illegal.

A win-win for both of us. She could even drop me off at the adult day-care on her way to classes. And could share my Meals-on Wheels.

UBER could handle trips to the doctor. See UBER post.

When she graduates, she could provide me with a replacement from the entering class.

And  I would be the envy of the senior community.

THINK OLD!


HOW BUSINESSES LOSE OLD PEOPLE – they don’t know what seniors want/need!

Last week I read The Longevity Economy, by Joseph F. Couglin, who is the founder and director of MIT’s AgeLab even though he is only 56. His basic thesis is that businesses do not really understand old people and what they want or need. I was intrigued enough, at 78, to 1) sign up as an AgeLab volunteer and 2) over the last week, while on a trip to Tucson, come up with personal examples of how businesses do not understand old people.

Here are just a few of my thoughts:

1. Side mirrors on cars do not let you see a car next to you on either side and it is hard to turn your head. I bought a blind spot mirror from Amazon and stuck it on my mirrors before I left.

2. The bath tub in our first hotel was too  high, with a step and inadequate grab bars.

3. The bed is high. I couldn’t sit on the edge and put my shoes on. I was unstable getting out of it in the middle of the night; and, I  get up often – another problem of aging

4. The TV clicker is difficult to use, though this one was simpler than most.

5. The restaurant is great. It is quiet and you can share a plate, unlike a lot of restaurants.

6. In case we don’t want to drive the distance, we have options. We can fly, we can use Uber/Lyft and  rent a car. A little more costly than the drive and stop but not much, and not the stress. We miss the non-stop SW flights from ABQ to TuS.

7. When we leave, ABQ, we notify our neighbors, set up on/off lights and hide the computer. When you think about it, we really don’t have much that the average thief would want.

8. The car is a Prius and after 6 years and 75,000 miles, we still average 55 miles to the gallon,which appeals to our geriatric cheapness. And it is easy to drive and park, although I would like a back up camera that is standard on new cars.

9. Freeways are ok outside of cities as we stick to the right lane. And use speed control.

10. We also plug the I-phone into the cigarette lighter so it is always charged. And of course, google maps gives us directions as to where we need to go.

11. We don’t drive at night on the freeway

12.  Food and  other items packed in plastic that old fingers can’t open. Knives are hard to use on plastic packages with arthritic fingers. Scissors are also difficult, but who travels with them.

13. The paper TV channel guide  has letters too small to read. The TV clicker was confusing, no grab bars in the bath tub, , bath tub too high,  so without a grab bar, difficult to step into. – For the blog I have enhanced the TV channel guide.

14. On the way back, we stayed at a famous old hotel, but again no grab-bars on the high tub and the bottles of shampoo and conditioner were over a foot tall and heavy.

15. Lights in hotel rooms are not designed for old people; nor is the placement and switches on lamps.

This is just a sample.

More to come.

THINK OLD!


INVEST IN INDEX FUNDS – the Oracle of Omaha’s sage advice!

Warren Buffett says that 90 % of  his estate will be  invested in index funds.

There is no more to be said; especially if you are old.

What makes me think that I, at 78, can invest in the stock market? At 78, for me, it is time to get real.

THINK OLD!

 


“SENIOR BUTTON” FOR THE GEEZER’S COMPUTER

I need a large “senior button” on my computer keyboard to take it into senior mode.

Pressing the button would disable everything I didn’t need including, without limitation, ads, spam, e-mails and anything except what I had specifically included.

The senior button has to be large, clearly marked and perhaps even a toggle switch or a button like the illustration that signals a bus driver that an old person wants off. I need to signal the computer that it needs to stop and let me off.

Pressing the senior button will disengage all the software and hardware, except for the following which would be in large print:

  1. E-mail from people I select.
  2. Skype in case my grandkids call.
  3. The obituary page of the local paper.
  4. Stock market update.
  5. geezer2go.com
  6. Select telephone numbers that by clicking would dial select friends and family members.
  7. E-mail addresses with a picture of the recipient.
  8. Printer.
  9. An onscreen volume control so I can hear.
  10. Daily menu at the local senior center.

When the button was pressed a second time, it would re-enable the computer so that my grandkids could fix things.

This would be simple.

Think about it. old people suffer from too much, not too little; and not just in computers. Think about the world you occupy. There are too many choices that require too much time to learn.

 

THINK OLD!

 

 

 

 


HOW TO STAY IN SHAPE ON A CRUISE!

There is no truth to the rumor that cruise lines weigh passengers when they board and when they leave, and that the one who gains the most weight gets a free trip. But, it seems that way. There is food everywhere and all the time. I keep looking for the resident gerontologist.

That said, cruise ships also have great fitness facilities and an assortment of food that allows you to eat only what is good for  you.

The fitness facilities on the Viking Sun are great and decidedly Scandinavian. The rule here is: “Showing up is half the battle.”  If you can move down a deck or two, you will  be one of  a handful of people who use the facilities. It is like the health club you belong to. (for free with Silver Sneakers). There are a few dozen out of hundreds of members who actually show up regularly.

On our Viking Sun Ocean Cruise the fitness facilities stood out even if only used by a few of us. We are the new 1 %, only it is health not money that moves us into this category of old people.

Viking Sun has:

  1.  A quarter-mile walking track with a half-dozen walkers. Great except for windy days.
  2. Fitness classes including yoga, Pilates, etc.
  3. Trainers for a fee.
  4. The best machines that I have ever used; and, I used them daily along with about a dozen others. (Out of 930 passengers, none of whom were children, there were few in the fitness rooms.)
  5. The usual spa treatments, massages, hair stylists, manicures, etc.
  6. A swimming pool
  7. A salt water whirl pool; a regular whirl pool; and a sauna.
  8. In addition and unusual on a cruise ship, a cold water bucket and the snow grotto. I tried the snow grotto – man-made snow in a glassed-in room kept at freezing temperature. I did not try the water bucket. These two reflect the Scandinavian love of hot and cold.

The snow grotto.

The cold water bucket.

THINK OLD!


ELDER HINT # 1 – LIVE WELL AND HAVE SOMETHING TO HANG ON TO – Grab Bars

Old people are stupid! Including me. I think I am the same person I was 20 years ago, even though my daily visit to the  mirror tells me different. I think I can do the same things that I did 20 years ago, and that there will be no consequences. The worst thing is I think I am as competent and as smart as I was 20 years ago. WRONG!

Old people need hints to make life easier and more convenient, not to mention safer. The idea is not to live long, but to live well for as long as you can. Living in rehab is NOT living well. There are a few steps you can take. I will post them as I think of them and you can do with them as you please.

REMEMBER: Don’t focus on longevity, focus on living the best life that you can, while you can.

# 1 Grab Bar as Towel Rack

Why are grab bars important to old people?

Falls are one of the greatest causes of  a miserable life. Think about it:

  1. You are prone to falling after a certain age.
  2. Grab bars are usually only in the tub or shower. Towel racks are not changed out. Yet, if you get out of a tub, the first thing you will grab for is a towel rack. So, why not replace the towel rack with a grab bar. One time grabbing hold of your old towel rack will convince you. Look at your towel rack. It sort of hangs on to a couple of screws. How many times has it come apart when you tried to hang a towel on it?
  3. You usually don’t wear your alert button in the shower.
  4. You usually shower alone; unlike years ago, a dim memory, if you even remember. Consider showering with a friend – for your own well-being, but two old people trying not to fall gives rise to a whole new blog idea.
  5. The bottom of the tub or shower tends to be slippery, thanks to soap.
  6. If you fall:
    1. It may take hours, or days, to find you if you live alone; or if your spouse is of questionable competency.
    2. If you break something, it is a trip to the hospital; then to rehab; then to assisted living: then ……….
  7. Breaks are painful.
  8. You may have locked the bathroom door.
  9. You don’t have your cell phone handy; and, it is usually not charged. And, you may not be any good at using it.
  10. You will feel like a fool lying naked on the bathroom floor when the para-medics break down the door to get you; or, when a friend who hasn’t heard from you for a few days comes to check on you.

THINK OLD!

 

 

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GEEZER FACES OLD AGE – hanging on…

NO COMMENT!

 


A SENIOR’S GREATEST SKILL – THE ABILITY TO MANEUVER – Physically, financially, emotionally!

The ability to maneuver has always been important. Loss of job, illness, lack of education, divorce, death, etc. You always need to be able to maneuver and to change. You need to move on from  and existing condition.

It is never so important as in old age. You are faced with physical problems, financial problems and mortality problems; just to mention a few. You have less and less ability to deal with them, so preparing for them and being able to maneuver through the last years of life is a real gift. You are in a maze.

PHYSICAL: We all die. Getting to death can be a painful, or at least an uncomfortable process, requiring thought, planning and action. You must not smoke, must not get too fat, must head off those disabilities that you can. Think, flu shot, etc. Exercise is the most  important; especially walking which 99% of us can do; and, it doesn’t take much. This will enable you to maneuver in and out of bed, to get to the store, to remain independent. It will also help to prevent falls.

FINANCIAL:  Bills don’t stop in old age. You may have social security and/or a pension and/or some savings, but you still have bills. You need to maneuver around the amount available and the expenditures required. You also need to avoid scammers and family members who have their hands out. You need a clear picture of the end of the tunnel and what you need to get there comfortably, even if it means leaving a little on the table at the end.

EMOTIONAL: Your friends, spouses and family members will die. How will this affect you? They will also develop various mental problems to and including Alzheimer’s. These are tough to deal with and you must be flexible so that you can deal with them.

DEATH: You can prepare for this by letting people know what you want. You want to maneuver yourself into a comfortable position without a lot of pain and a reasonable amount of competence and mobility. There is no point in being propped up in front of a TV for the last few years; you might as well get it over with. You will have to maneuver around a number of well-meaning people; and, some not so well-meaning, but planning can do it. There are more and more end-of-life resources available to old people. Know what they are and how them might be useful to you.

COMPETENCY: This is the tricky one; as you slip into incompetency, whether you call it dementia, senior moment, or whatever, you have more and more difficulty making decisions, remembering things and taking rational actions. This requires advance flexibility. You must have senior algorithms in place to deal with your declining years. If not, you will slip into chaos.

The bottom line is to keep loose, maintain as much flexibility as possible and to the extent possible, as IBM once put it:  THINK!

THINK OLD!


SHOULD THE GEEZER BE A PRISONER?

Prison may be an alternative to life on the street for old people.

A photo of where the geezer might spend his last years. Better than the street???

The geezer asks for admission to the Federal Prison system.

The geezer seeks bank support for admission to the Federal Prison system.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In the US there are 26,200 prisoners over 65 in state and federal prisons and 124,400 over the age of 55.

The geezer, who is 75, and an “opportunist” is thinking outside the box; or perhaps ‘inside the box.” If I have no money, little social security, no home, no assets, no family; and  have to line up at the soup kitchen for meals and the free street clinic for medical care, maybe there is another way.

At 75, what do I need? My sex life is a thing of the past; there is no one to take care of me, I am frequently wet and cold; I am regularly exposed to every type of riffraff; and, can no longer fight off street predators.  How can I  live out my days in some comfort, be warm, eat regularly, and have  adequate medical and dental care?

The answer is to rob a bank.

The sentence seems to be 10 years plus an extra 5 years if you have a gun. I need to check to see if the gun has to be loaded; wouldn’t want to hurt anyone. The 15 years takes me to 90 which is about my  life expectancy  on a good day and I don’t have to0 many of  them. If I got in a fight or two,  I can avoid good time.

The big problem is that I might get probation since I don’t have a record; so, I might have to rob the same bank twice; or, even three times.

Given the economic and social future of the elderly, prison doesn’t sound too bad; and, it can’t be worse than a nursing home; even if I qualified. If you can’t pay, Medicaid is the only answer. Assisted living is out of the question without money or long-term care insurance.

There is probably a downside, but I am having trouble seeing it.

The food can’t be worse than most senior institutions. If I have a room(cell)mate, he would probably be about my age. I would probably be in some sort of minimum security facility, but, given the gun I might be in a maximum security facility.  The friends I would make would probably be better than the ones on the street.

Would I be safe? Probably. I am sure that most Federal Prisons take care of old people; albeit, reluctantly. There are work programs in most institutions and perhaps I could care for other old people if I couldn’t get assigned to the library. Win-win.

The New York Times has an article on California state prisons that have caregivers called ” gold coats.” These are inmates, usually murderers, who in exchange for a “gold coat,” and other privileges, look after the elderly; especially those with dementia. They protect them from the other prisoners, get them food, make sure they don’t fall; and, in general act as highly trained caregivers. They sound better than some in nursing homes I have visited.

Do I want to go this route? I suppose it depends on how cold and hungry I get; and, if I am competent to rob a bank when the time comes.

Or, maybe it would just be cheaper and better to move all of us old prisoners and “Gold Coats” to the “abandoned” military bases where they are keeping illegal immigrants.

THINK OLD!