“SENIOR BUTTON” FOR THE GEEZER’S COMPUTER

I need a large “senior button” on my computer keyboard to take it into senior mode.

Pressing the button would disable everything I didn’t need including, without limitation, ads, spam, e-mails and anything except what I had specifically included.

The senior button has to be large, clearly marked and perhaps even a toggle switch or a button like the illustration that signals a bus driver that an old person wants off. I need to signal the computer that it needs to stop and let me off.

 

Pressing the senior button will disengage all the software and hardware, except for the following which would be in large print:

  1. E-mail from people I select.
  2. Skype in case my grandkids call.
  3. The obituary page of the local paper.
  4. Stock market update.
  5. geezer2go.com
  6. Select telephone numbers that by clicking would dial select friends and family members.
  7. E-mail addresses with a picture of the recipient.
  8. Printer.
  9. An onscreen volume control so I can hear.
  10. Daily menu at the local senior center.

When the button was pressed a second time, it would re-enable the computer so that my grandkids could fix things.

This would be simple.

Think about it. old people suffer from too much, not too little; and not just in computers. Think about the world you occupy. There are too many choices that require too much time to learn.

 

THINK OLD!

 

 

 

 


ROBOT CAREGIVER FOR OLD PEOPLE

 

TIME FOR THE GEEZER’S SHOT!

I have been reading a lot about robots and old people lately. We have a surplus of old people and a shortage of caregivers.  Is a robot caregiver the answer? At 75 future care is a constant thought; for me and for my friends. I thought about a robot in my future  over coffee on Tuesday morning. Like most of my thoughts, these are irreverent.

  1. A robot changing my diapers. Picture me, lying on a bed, naked from the waist down, with a robot, wiping me and putting on a new diaper. How would a robot hold me in place? It’s bad enough changing a baby, imagine a robot changing me! And, don’t forget the security camera that the robot is required to wear is going all the time.
  2. Could the robot identify strangers who came into my home? Then what?
  3. Could a robot prevent falls?
  4. A robot could probably take my vital signs; a smart phone can do that now with a little help.
  5. Can a robot cook? Thaw and heat a meals-on-wheels selection? Probably.
  6. Clean? I hope so.
  7. How will a robot react with other people around?
  8. Will a robot like my dog? Will my dog like the robot?
  9. How much would it cost to make my home robot friendly? Could I find a place where the robot couldn’t find me? If so, it would probably dial 911.
  10. Could I short-circuit a robot? Probably it would dial 911 if I did.
  11. What are the ongoing maintenance and repair costs of a robot?
  12. What are the costs of monitoring the robot and maintaining a call center to deal with calls from the robot?
  13. Would a robot scare me? Think of Hal 9000 in 2001: A Space Odyssey – before the time of most current robot designers.
  14. Could a robot bathe/shower me without drowning me or short-circuiting the robot?
  15. Heavy lifting would be plus. A robot could save a lot in workman’s comp. claims or the necessity of hiring two caregivers for someone of my weight.
  16. Theft. Identify a stranger? If the robot was stolen, we could probably locate it using our i-phone.
  17. Could the robot take the place of my geriatric psychologist; listen to me, counsel me?
  18. Could the robot provide comfort to me when I slip into Alzheimer’s? Or would I have to have two robots?
  19. Paying bills? Is my robot trustworthy?
  20. The robot could probably sign in to Skype and give my kids several views of what I was doing at any given time. It could also provide a security video that was not erased for thirty days and which my kids and my doctor could access along with a running record of my vital signs, urinalysis results, weight, diaper changing, etc.
  21. The  robot would be perfect for the new driverless cars.
  22. The robot could dial UBER.
  23. The robot could get together with SIRI and order anything I needed.
  24. The robot could exercise me; whether I wanted it or not. Picture a robot designed to exercise me; and, me, not wanting to exercise.
  25. The robot could be programmed for Robot Assisted Suicide; however, this might violate the First Law of Robotics.
  26. The robot might have a copy of my advance directive and not consult with me.
  27. The robot could file my taxes.
  28. If I have Alzheimer’s; can the robot deal with that? The robot is very logical; I would just be street-smart.
  29. How would the robot deal with my girl friend? Could I program it to stay out of the bedroom?
  30. If I needed surgery, could the robot do it?

The above are just the thoughts of an old man who might be a perfect candidate for a robot caregiver. Most people don’t realize that they are old until suddenly they reach the “tipping point” at which time, they are there.

At least, I have a number of ideas for future blogs. So, stay tuned.

Maybe I should just go with a therapeutic robot from Parorobots.com to pet:

 

Robots, not caregivers, helping old people.

A comfort robot instead of a comfort dog for the elderly in Japan??

THINK OLD!

 


TEN THINGS TO OUTSOURCE WHEN YOU ARE OVER 75!

There are some things old people should not do for themselves.

At 75, the geezer found a task he should outsource. –

Outsource is a business term whereby certain activities are contracted out to other businesses or individuals. The reason is that the task can be done cheaper, safer or better by another and it allows the outsourcer  to focus on its primary task.

This can be applied to old age.  At 75, due to physical and mental problems, it may be cheaper, better and safer to have certain tasks outsourced. It may even turn out to be life-saving if you decide to climb a ladder and clean the leaves out of the gutters instead of hiring it done.

At 75 you need to think about what you can outsource and what you can do yourself.

Ten things that you might consider outsourcing:

  1. Anything that requires a ladder, a stool or standing on the couch to fix.
  2. Driving
  3. Medical advice
  4. Paying bills – you can outsource with automatic payment plans, an accountant, or a kid.
  5. Legal advice
  6. Shopping
  7. Investing
  8. Charitable donations
  9. Repairs
  10. Care

The list is not complete. You should modify it according to your needs. Old people are stubborn. They think that they are more competent than they are. They think that they can still do things, that they can’t do. The result is that they frequently injure, kill or bankrupt themselves when with a little outsourcing they could continue to live happy,  productive lives.

The most important part of outsourcing is KISS. (Keep it simple, stupid.)

THINK OLD!


Outsourcing Old Age – Things You Should Consider Outsourcing!

Outsourcing is all the rage; but mostly has been defined as sending out work to reduce costs. If you are old you should outsource. The reason is to cut costs, but not just in monetary terms, but also in terms of health and wellbeing. You can’t afford to fall; fail to file taxes; or, miss important deadlines.

You have already outsourced. You didn’t do the surgery to implant your pacemaker, you outsourced the job to a surgeon. When you were younger you could do more things for yourself. It was no problem to climb up on the roof on an old ladder and  lean over to get the leaves out of the gutter; but, at 73, NO! You can’t afford a fall. It will cost a lot and may be the beginning of the end.

What should you outsource?  It depends on the individual, but you should consider the following:

  1. Anything that involves climbing or balancing.
  2. Financial care including preparation of your taxes.
  3. Driving
  4. Medical care
  5. Memory related

Who should you outsource to:

  1. A spouse, unless s/he is near your age and condition.
  2. A child – hopefully you have a good relationship
  3. An accountant
  4. An attorney
  5. A close friend whom you trust
  6. A bank
  7. A  handi-person
  8. Someone referred by a friend, neighbor or family member.
  9. Angie’s list

At what point do you outsource? Sooner rather than later.

What if you don’t outsource?

  1. It may cost you a lot more.
  2. It may affect your health.
  3. It will cause you anxiety.
  4. It may be the last thing you don’t do.

The biggest problem is that you think that you are still  competent.  You haven’t taken a long hard look in the mirror lately. And, you can be stubborn and obnoxious. The  result is that you think you can do something that you can’t.

Think about it.

Think Old!!!

 old man