19th ANNUAL BELEN MATANZA – BELEN, NM – Jan 26, 2019

Two years age I attended the Matanza in Belen, NM where I ate my fill of roasted whole hog, beans, chile, and tortillas. This year it is scheduled for January 26, 2019 from 8:00 AM to 3:00 PM at Eagle Park in Belen, NM, about 30 miles South of Albuquerque, NM.

Matanzas involve roasting a whole pig overnight in a pit dug in the ground. It is a celebration for all your family and friends. It involves a lot of home-made food and too much drinking. The first one I attended was when I came to Albuquerque over 50 years ago and was held on Thanksgiving Day. Lou had obtained a 300 pound hog and the night before it was placed in a pit in his backyard, wrapped in wet burlap, and laid on top of a huge bed of coals. The hog was then covered with coals  and dirt and left to roast for twelve hours.

It was hoisted out of the pit, unwrapped, and the meat fell off the bones. More beer, pinto beans, tortillas, salad and pork made the Thanksgiving Dinner one that I remember to this day.

The one in Belen is more organized, raising money for charity. It costs $15 and is preceded by judges determining who made the best red chile, pork, tortillas and chicharrones. There are long lines and no shortage of beer. It is best to come early.

You can read about the “World’s Largest Matanza” in the January 2018 issue of New Mexico Magazine. The article, “Whole Hog” by Gwyneth Doland is worth reading. The article also contains recipes if you want to create your own Matanza, and tells you where to buy a whole hog. Go for it.

The 2017 Belen Matanza was the first I attended.

For instructions see the Weekly Alibi

Cornucopia Matanza

World’s Largest Matanza

The 2017 Matanza in Valencia County, NM

 

THINK OLD!


TRAINS – RESTORING 2926 in ALBUQUERQUE – a geezerTrip

 

 

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In Albuquerque, NM I visited the 2926 Restoration Project. The New Mexico Steam locomotive and Railroad Historical Society is restoring a steam engine that hit the tracks on May 17, 1944. It travelled 1,090,539 miles. It is being completely restored by volunteers and will be put back into service for excursions soon, we hope.

You can visit the restoration project on Wednesdays and Saturdays at 1833 8th NW, Albuquerque, New Mexico. One of the members will give you a  tour and explain what the restoration.

It is close to Old Town and the Indian Pueblo Cultural Center.

Try Cafe Azul for the best huevos rancheros with Hatch green chile – get the papitas, not the hash browns. BUT: the hot Hatch green chile may take you way out of your comfort zone. Remember you can always have it on the side.

 In September there is always the model railroad exhibit at the state Fair. If you like New Mexico trains,  ride the Amtrak, the Railrunner, and the Cumbres and Toltec narrow gage. At Christmas, take the Cumbres and Toltec through the snow.

Ride the RailRunner to Belen, NM  and visit the rail museum and Harvey House with The University of New Mexico Division of Continuing Education.

You can see a video showing the history and restoration of 2926 on You Tube.

THINK OLD!!

 


BIKE/WALKING PATHS IN ALBUQUERQUE!

Bike/walking path along Rio Grande River in Albuquerque, NM

Bike/walking path along Rio Grande River in Albuquerque, NM

100 yards from my home there is a walking/bike path, the Paseo del Bosque Trail, which runs for 18 miles without crossing a street. The asphalt part  has two lanes for bikes, runners and walkers. The gravel path next to it is ideal for walking. It is about 100 yards from the Rio Grande River and is the home of coyotes, owl, ducks, geese, beavers, and numerous birds.

It attracts balloons, bikers, walkers, runners, baby carriages and dogs on leashes. (A dog off the leash is a free lunch for a coyote, as are neighborhood chickens.)

A few miles down the path, you come to Tingley Beach where you can boat and fish. You also have the Albuquerque Zoo,  the Albuquerque Aquarium, and the Albuquerque Bio-park. Going in the other direction for a half a mile you come to the Nature Center and a small pond. There are walking paths leading to the Rio Grande River. There is limited access and no motor vehicles.

The Path joins other paths. There is now a  50 mile activity path circling the city. I have heard that there are also people starting to walk the entire 50 miles over a several day period; sort of civic pilgrimage route.

The Paseo del Bosque Trail is ideal for older people. You can walk, ride bikes or  push grandchildren. You can always meet a few people who you know if you are a regular. The open-space officers will point out nesting birds each spring; especially owls and hawks which are regulars. There are birders with their GPS devices locating various species of birds.

The balloons follow the path and the river; and sometimes land on  our street. They are a daily occurrence.

It is a valuable city asset.

THINK OLD!


LEAVING THE GROUND IN NEW MEXICO – the sky’s the limit!

New Mexico is the place to go if you want to get off the ground. Last week-end we went to the glider field at the Moriarty Airport,  50 miles from Albuquerque. There we saw dozens of gliders and several tow planes. A 15 minute glider ride from Sundance Aviation costs $105 and you fly with an FAA approved, experienced pilot. The only downside is that you have to weigh less than 220 pounds and be under 6′ 5″.

 

Near by is the US Southwest Soaring Museum which unfortunately was closed on Sundays.

Naturally this got me to thinking, and I discovered over Albuquerque via Google:

Trike Flights –  This is an air tricycle. You can get a 30 minute ride for $100 with a licensed Sport Pilot. For an additional fee you can have a video made showing you in flight. I frequently see these mechanical trikes while I am walking along the Rio Grande.

Plane rides at Vertical Lift Aviation.

Helecopter Rides.

Parachute jumping. Starting at $375 with Albuquerque Sky Diving.

Hang gliding with High Desert Hang Gliding.

All near or in Albuquerque and while I have only taken a balloon ride, the others have intrigued me. I have not taken any but the hot air balloon ride, an Albuquerque must, but am intrigued at 77 and sorry that I missed them earlier in my life. I am toying with the glider ride.

More my speed is the Sandia Peak Ski & Tramway which will take you on a 2.7 mile tram ride to the top of Sandia Peak from Albuquerque. There is sking, a restaurant and great hiking. At your age, watch the altitude which is over 11,000 feet. You can always sit in the restaurant and enjoy the view with a glass of wine.

The big draw in and over Albuquerque is the Albuquerque Balloon Fiesta held for a week every October, where up to a 1000 balloons participate in a mass ascension, among other events. And of course, there are hot air balloon rides then and the year around. The traffic is horrible, but if you have an RV, there is great RV parking next to the grounds. Balloon pilots and their chase crews are hard to keep up with at my age, especially in the evening.

There is also the Anderson Abruzzo International Balloon Foundation Museum.

Most mornings I can see hot air balloons following the Rio Grande River behind my home, which is about my speed.

It is worth soaring  above the New Mexico desert, there is no age limit, and it gives you some great stories and pictures to impress your grandkids with.

THINK OLD!


ROUNDING UP BISON IN NEW MEXICO with Ted Turner Expeditions

On Friday, January 26th, I followed hundreds of bison being rounded up on Ted Turner’s Ladder Ranch, near Truth or Consequences, New Mexico. The tour was sponsored by Ted Turner Expeditions and was the 2nd annual Bison RoundUp. The tour part of the roundup lasted for 2 days and the bison on the 250 square mile ranch had been collected over the last several months. This was the last collection of bison and herds of 200 to 500 bison were driven into pens where they would be weighed, tagged and checked before being released.

The roundup lasted about 5 hours each day and involved 4 cowboys on horseback and 4 on ATV’s keeping the bison in line. The bison followed a truck that they mistook for a feed truck. Behind the herd, 15 of us who had signed up for the tour watched from ATV’s.

The 28 Turner Ranches are home to 51,000 bison.

The roundup is not advertised and will become an annual event. I received an e-mail invitation since we had stayed at the Sierra Grande Lodge in T or C, New Mexico, which is owned by Turner. The first class restaurant serves bison and the Lodge has natural hot springs spa tubs available to guests along with massages.

Turner Expeditions offers numerous other tours on the various ranches; all directed toward conservation and the preservation of natural habitats.

The Ladder Ranch has no paved roads, is 29 miles from T or C, and is near the Amadaros Ranch, another Turner Ranch. It is also near the NM Spaceport and Elephant Butte Lake. There are several vinyards that produce good wine. Turner’s Vermejo ranch is in Northern New Mexico, near Philmont Scout Ranch, where I first ate Bison in 1955.

The cost was $175 plus tax for a 7 hour day including driving time to the Ladder Ranch.

The guides were great and informative – they knew all about the flora and fauna on the ranch and a lot about the history.

The bison roundup is fascinating; with real cowboys and bison that  are genetically pure .

In addition to bison, we saw a 40 Elk in a line and numerous birds. The  ranch is a wildlife paradise and all of the  ranches offer photographic expeditions.

 

 

I was told that there were about 27 bison bulls for 1500 cows, and that last year all but two of the cows had calves; however, I was unable to verify this.

 

And, of course, if you want to eat bison:

or, it is available at Whole Foods.

 

Sources:

Ted Turner Expeditions

Whole Foods

Ladder Ranch

Sierra Grande Lodge

T or C, NM

 

 


CHIHULY EXHIBIT AT VANDERBILT MANSION, Ashville, NC – glass blowing gone wild!

Dale Chihuly is a glass sculpture who creates large masterpieces of blown glass. I recently visited the exhibition at the New York Botanical Garden where Chihuly’s works were displayed on the grounds.

I am at a loss to understand how the glass sculptures can survive in an outdoor, park setting.

Chihuly Exhibition at New York Botanical Garden  until October 29, 2017. I saw it in the Bronx. This blog is updated as it is now as the Vanderbilt Mansion in Asheville, NC.

 

 

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If you get a chance, you should visit his works which are displayed around the world and visit the exhibit in the Bronx. (Closes the end of October 2017.)

Visit the Chihuly web page  to learn about the sculptor and his works.

You can find Future exhibits at this location. The exhibit opened at the Biltmore in Asheville, North Carolina on May 17, 2018 and will run through October 7, 2018.

If you are in New Mexico, there are two Chihuly works in the dining hall at United World College in Montezuma, New Mexico. UWC is also interesting, located in a renovated Castle built in 1881. UWC is worth a visit and the idea of a castle in New Mexico that is more than 100 years old is something to think about.

The exhibits and the collections all seem to be in places that are interesting on their own, even without these exhibits.

 

THINK OLD!

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SPARKY’S – Lunch in Hatch, NM

This post had to be edited to announce that Sparky’s won the Green Chile Cheeseburger Challenge at the New Mexico State Fair.

 

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Sparky’s is the place to stop in Hatch, NM. It is just off I-25, 185 miles South of Albuquerque, NM and 38 miles North of Las Cruces, NM. The population is 1673; with 12.3% over 65. Thirty Thousand people show up on Labor Day for the Hatch Chile Festival.  Hatch green chile is known throughout the Southwest and can be found in any New Mexico grocery store.

Sparky’s is a great stop if you are going from Albuquerque to Tucson and taking the Hatch-Deming by-pass to I-10. The by-pass passes huge dairy farms, a solar farm and a wind farm, not to mention cattle ranches and fields of green chile, and of course the omnipresent immigrant check-point.

Sparky’s has collected every large fast food statute that you can imagine and has placed them along the highway and around Sparky’s.

You can order the green-chile cheese burger and have it cut in half if you are old; or, even if you are not. The geezer is a big advocate of shared plates. You order/pay at the counter and find your own seat. It may be outside or next door where there is a stage, sound equipment and  the largest collection of cookie jars that I have ever seen. If you are over 70, it is nostalgaville. Things you haven’t seen since the 40’s.

On Friday, Saturday and Sunday, they have bands you never heard if you are over 70, playing country and the blues. It is closed on Mon, Tue and Wed. so plan your trip carefully.

You might think that you would be out of your comfort zone at Sparky’s; but take it from the Geezer, you will feel right at home.  The Geezer is an advocate of leaving your comfort zone, as long as it doesn’t hurt. Beats the usual turnpike fare.

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PECOS BENEDICTINE MONASTERY – Pecos, NM

The Albuquerque Journal announced that the Pecos Benedictine Monastery was having an open house. I attended and discovered a quiet place to visit. It has about a dozen monks and numerous volunteers. They support themselves by holding retreats and by allowing private retreats. Look at their web page; pecosmonastery.org. Trappist monks bought the place in 1947. It has been transferred to several religious orders since then ending up as the Our Lady of Guadalupe Abbey today.

Our Lady of Guadalupe Abbey at Pecos, NM.

The Abbey is about 20 miles from Santa Fe, NM in the small town of Pecos. The Catholic Church in Pecos dates back to 1862. This is rural Northern, New Mexico, midway between Santa Fe and Las Vegas, NM.

There are numerous guest rooms, several chapels, a library and of course friendly monks. There is a common room with wi-fi and they have the necessary equipment  for retreats.

Double guest room with bath at Our Lady of Guadalupe Abbey

Double guest room with bath at Our Lady of Guadalupe Abbey

The bedrooms are simple, but fancier than what I imagined a monk’s cell to be like; having seen a few in Europe. They have private baths, a desk and a closet. No phones, no TV’s; just the simple basics. This is a monastic place.

The Abbey has 1000 acres; of which about 4o can be planted and used for buildings. That leaves about 960 acres along the Pecos River for contemplation.

Grounds at Our Lady of Guadalupe Abbey.

Grounds at Our Lady of Guadalupe Abbey.

We did not stay overnight; however, if you want to and if you take the AARP discount, it is $67.50 per night and that includes three meals and all the quiet you want. There are common areas with WiFi and each room has a desk. It will be a great place to get caught up on a blog.

It is not for everyone; however, if you are the geezer’s age, overwhelmed by this electronic society, and looking for a new social setting, there is something relaxing about the place.

I couldn’t help but compare it to long-term care facilities that I have visited; and, at some future point, if they would have me, I would much prefer to live at the Abbey, rather than an in-town assisted living  facility. There is plenty to do and it might give some purpose and meaning to the end of life.

Anyway,  you might want to try it; or any monastery. Most take guests, even in Europe, and they are all over, need the money and certainly need volunteers.

An old book that I like is: A Guide to Monastic Guest Houses, 2nd Edition by Robert J. Regalbuto which is available on Amazon.

And, if you are really interested, some of the Refugios that I stayed in when I walked the Camino de Santiago are in monasteries.

THINK OLD!

 

 


ORPHAN TRAINS – 1854-1929

I had never heard of “Orphan Trains” until a few years ago when I came across a notice in the Tucson Weekly, a weekly free alternative newspaper. (Wherever you go, pick up a copy of the free alternative papers for the most comprehensive, and unique, happenings in the town you are visiting.) 

Orphan Trains operated between 1854 and 1929 and transported over 200,000 homeless children in New York, NY to every state in the continental United States. The children were often street children, but many were turned over by parents and orphanages. Remember that this was initially a few years after the Irish potato famine and many children hit New York without parents.

The children were loaded onto trains, frequently in the last car, with a woman who supervised them and arranged for their disbursement along the way. Their ages ranged from infancy to about 14; no girls over 12 for fear of sexual exploitation. They had no documentation, not birth certificates and virtually no chance of adoption.

When the trains stopped, locals appeared, either by pre-arrangement or by chance, and selected the child they wanted. They often broke up families.They were necessary to the development of the West and the railroads carried them for free or at a reduced fare.

Alison Moore has documented this in her book Riders On the Orphan Train. She and her husband appeared on February 16, 2014 at the Southern Arizona Transportation Museum in a multi-media show. Something none of us knew about.

Moore puts on shows all across the country. To find out when and where go to: http://www.ridersontheorphantrain.org/

It is worth it, free and will open your eyes to something you had no idea existed. You can also visit the Orphan Train Depot in Concordia, Kansas.

Keep looking for things that might interest you and that are out of your comfort zone.

An article on “Orphan Trains” that might interest you is found in the New Orleans Times-Picayune.

 


TRUTH OR CONSEQUENCES, NEW MEXICO – the journey, not the goal, is the goal!

Several times a year we drive the 450 miles from Albuquerque, NM to Tucson, AZ to see our grandchildren. The trip takes about 7 1/2 hours, but since we are retired and have extra time, we  explore along the way. In old age, you come to realize that the trip may be as important as the goal.

Between Albuquerque and Tucson, you can find a number of interesting things all in New Mexico and all just off I-25: the Very Large Array Telescopes near Socorro, NM, the Hatch Chile Festival and Sparky’s,  SpacePort America, Elephant Butte Lake, and, usually an overnight stop at the Sierra Grande Lodge and Spa, owned by Ted Turner which in addition to providing an interesting Lodge, also provides tours of Ted Turner’s nearby ranches.

Since I originally wrote this, Spaceport America has restarted tours.

The lobby at Sierra Grande Lodge and Spa in Truth or Consequences, New Mexico.

Spaceport America, near Truth or Consequences, New Mexico

Fire truck at Spaceport America.

In our 70’s the Sierra Grande Lodge gets us out of our comfort zone, which is good, if at times unnerving. I haven’t had bison in 63 years, when I had it at Philmont Scout Ranch, at the end of a 37 day trek at age 14. The restaurant serves bison burgers, bison rib-eye, and if you just want to test the water, 4 ounces of bison steak in a great pasta dish. You can eat indoors or out; the patio is great:

Animas Creek Pasta With Bison

 

Outdoor Patio – Restaurant at Sierra Grande Lodge.

The Lodge, like many other places in T or C has it’s own hot springs. There are indoor spas and an outdoor one. The naturally  hot water has made T or C a destination for a thousand years. It used to be called Hot Springs, NM until it won a 1950 radio show contest hosted by  Ralph Edwards, and changed its name.

We like the outdoor spa; private but open to the stars. In our 70’s we are out of our comfort zone for nude bathing; and it may even be pornographic, but a half-hour soak removes a lot of age-related soreness and is included in the price of your room.

 

Outdoor Hot Springs Spa at Sierra Grande Lodge, Truth or Consequences, NM

 

Outdoor hot springs spa as Sierra Grande Lodge.

Next time you travel to see your grandkids, look around you, take your time, and try to get out of your “old” comfort zone. You may learn something new.

The point is; especially at your age, you should be interested in the journey, not the END of the journey.

THINK OLD!

 

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