OLD PEOPLE SHOULD USE FINGER SECURITY!!

 

 

Most old people have trouble keeping track of passwords. Even when they write them down, they lose them, or have trouble typing them in to their phones or iPads.

Or, their passwords are so simple or common, that any 10 year old can hack them

There is a simple solution. Use your fingerprint as your password.

I am writing this blog after signing in using my index finger on the sign on button.

I access my Bank of America Account, (“sign in with Touch ID”) not with a password, but with my index finger. I suppose someone could cut off my index finger and access my accounts, but at 79 this is not a major worry.

Some of the newer tablets and phones have facial recognition; but do I want to smile at my iPad to sign in? And, I have a very old face.

There is voice recognition which is what Vanguard uses. I call my broker, repeat a sentence (provided and prerecorded) and have secure access to my account,

I like 2-factor sign-in, or multi-factor authentication, where you get a 6 digit number in an iPhone messages or by e-mail. This is after you have fingered your way across the threshold identification. You add the 6 digit number and you are in.

You should use this for all financial accounts.

I still like my index finger. I may insure it.

Ask your financial institution about multi-factor authentication.

THINK OLD! – THINK SIMPLE!

 


VENUS -A restaurant out of our past today!

I like a restaurant that reminds me of my past (60 to 70 years ago); and, like most people my age, I prefer non-chain restaurants. In Largo, Florida there is Venus Restaurant. It has been family owned since 1985, is small, and seems to cater to an older neighborhood population.

There are booths, tables and an outdoor seating area where  smoking is apparently allowed; at least I could smell cigarette smoke which is unusual; even in Florida. The walls are covered with pictures drawn by grade-school grandchildren, the waitresses are friendly and the parking lot is always crowded.

The food is simple, not processed and reflective of by-gone times. Where else can you find beef liver and onions (small portion) for $7.49 “served with a choice of the following sides: cup of soup, or side salad, potato, vegetable or a pudding dessert.”

They also serve fish, meat-loaf, burgers and pasta; plus an assortment of Greek dishes and pudding for dessert.

Breakfast:

“2-2-2

$5.99
two eggs, 2 pieces of bacon, 2 pieces of sausage, potatoes or grits, toast and jelly.”
Check out the Venus menu.
Venus is obviously up-scale as there was a black Rolls Royce in the parking lot in 2017 :
This was originally written in 2017. When I went back this week for lunch, there was a brand new, blue Rolls Royce in the parking lot. Nothing else had changed.
Lunch was Greek, and more than we could eat, but excellent:

Of course, since there are a lot of Canadians who vacation in Indian Rocks Beach, they served their version of poutine, with gravy on the side – no cheese curds:

Venus Restaurant

727-581-3849

2441 West Bay Drive

Largo, FL 33770

 

THINK OLD – TRAVEL MORE:


SALT LAKE CITY – a genealogy adventure for seniors!

Salt Lake City, Utah, the home of the Mormon Church, is also the repository of one of the largest genealogy collections in the world. It is not just a collection, but a large and active group of genealogists.

We recently went to Salt Lake City  because I have   an interest in genealogy and The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints Family History Library is the place to go. And we had to use up two Southwest Tickets. I  had not been there since 1953 (Boy Scout Jamboree in Irvine, California) when we stopped on the way.

My focus was on the Genealogy Center. I am a member of the New Mexico Genealogy Society and like many old people am interested in stories out of my past. For example see: Bertha and Gertrude.

The Center is several stories high with several basements.  The main floor provides a hands-on genealogy experience; complete with the latest audio-visual equipment and interactive exhibits. You can track your ancestors.

The main research room consists of hundreds of computers and dozens of Elders who are available to assist you in your research. All  you have to do is raise your hand and a knowledgeable Elder is at your side explaining what you need to do. They are genealogy experts.

Computer Stations on the First Floor of the Genealogy Center.

You can spend all day there.

The library has every thing a genealogist needs; and, they are adding to it every day.

 

Organ

Every day at noon there is  a free organ concert; well worth attending.

The rest of Salt Lake City is interesting. We stayed a block from Temple Square in an AirBnB. We could walk everywhere, but there was also a tram.

There was a good restaurant for breakfast in a Church Building; however, no coffee. They directed us to a cafe down the street where we could get coffee to go. By the time I picked it up, my breakfast was ready.

We had dinner at Lyon House; cafeteria style.

The food is simple and the portions generous. Again, no coffee; and, no alcohol. Eating at non-church restaurants allowed us wine with our meals.

The  3 night trip exceeded our expectations. We arrived in the afternoon, took a $11 Lyft ride to The Kimball a block from Temple Square and settled in.

There are several church related museums.

We watched people line up outside the Temple to get married. There were dozens of groups waiting their turn to go into the Temple; non-church members are not allowed in.

There are genealogy sources in all  states at Mormon Churches.

You can find out about your ancestors without exposing yourself, your age, your ignorance, etc. Old People like to find out things anonymously.

What do old people want to know? Five “old” keys to the Salt Lake City trip:

  1. Ease of getting there and around.
  2. Cost – Salt Lake City is reasonable and walkable in the downtown area.
  3. Safety and security. Salt Lake City felt safe and secure.
  4. Interesting stories  to tell when you get home.
  5. Preparation. Salt Lake City is easy to search and prepare for.

Think Old! Travel Now!


TV REMOTE CONTROLS – Why old people go crazy in vacation rentals!

After 79 years I have just barely managed to work my TV at home. Now, every time I am in a new vacation rental, I face an impossible learning experience. I have yet to be able to turn on a TV with ease. Why, I am not sure. This week in Indian Rocks Beach, Florida, a favorite place of ours, was the worst.

There are three TV’s in the unit and NINE TV remote devices. Fortunately the master bedroom only has one.

The living room TV has 6 remotes.

The first night, and over the week-end, I could only make the TV in the master bedroom work; and that only by punching several buttons at random. The TV in the living room simply flashed “No Signal” and “35 Animal Planet.”

On Monday I went to the management company and they suggested that I contact the cable provider. They gave me a number.

The cable provider telephone call consisted of a series of messages and suggestions; none of which did any good and ended up suggesting that I unplug the system, wait 20 minutes, and attempt to restart. I did this. Nothing. I then unplugged the system again, waited an hour, restarted the system. Again nothing. So, I turned to drink.

After a few hours, I called the cable provider again, and by carefully punching buttons on my phone, finally got to a live operator. She was very nice. She must have a nice grandfather.

She suggested I punch “source” on my remote. At first I couldn’t find it; but then hiding at the bottom in small type, was a button that said “video source,” right next to the red button that said “light.”

I punched the video source button and got several choices. By sorting through them (it took me a couple minutes to figure out how  to go from one to another), I hit on one that turned the TV on. Not clear, but after a while the TV got to the point where  could find some familiar channels.

For the next several days, it took several attempts with the  remote to get the cable. I never could make it work in the guest bedroom, but….

Even after I managed to start getting the  cable channels, I got ads popping up suggesting that I upgrade this or that. There seemed to be no way to get away from them except by powering off and restarting the TV.

The one remote that finally worked has 63 buttons; each with small hard to read (and harder to understand) words.

On a prior trip, but a different condo, all of the clickers were dead. After a couple of days, and calls, we discovered that the batteries were not only dead, but corroded.

The remotes are not labeled. They each control a different tv, vcr, or some other electronic device.

I realize that I am 79; that my grandchildren were not with me; and, that I am not versed in “remotes;” however, I notice that a lot of old people rent condos in Florida during the school year, when things are quieter. You would think that there could be a simple solution.

Old people tend to watch TV. Imagine if my life revolved around Jeopardy? I would go crazy if the remote did not allow me to access that.

I have come up with a simple check list. This should help, not just with tv remotes, but with most of the problems old people have with electronics.

  1. Don’t wait. Face the problem now.
  2. Prepare- whoever you contact is going to want information that you don’t have, so get it.
    1. numbers
    2. time
    3. photos on your cell phone
    4. contacts – owner – manager
  3. Think it through
  4. Use your age as a bargaining chip. “I am 79 and need your help.”
  5. Try everything. Whomever you contact will ask you.
  6. Be nice.
  7. Seek help; in person, if possible.
  8. Finally, call your grandson or granddaughter.

THINK OLD!


GeezerPack – Shipping Older Loved Ones

Transporting old people is a pain. They complain, are difficult to work with, and it is time-consuming. Think of a cross-country car trip with the Geezer. Not to mention the expense and the time missed from work.

The Geezer has developed “GeezerPack.” If you have a loved-one over the age of 70, packed (perhaps “boxed” is more accurate)  and ready to go by 5:00 PM, live delivery anywhere in the continental United States is guaranteed by 10:00 AM the next day. Included is a packing box with a comfortable chair, portable light with extra batteries, boxed lunch, water bottle, tranquilizer, portable tape-player with the hits of the 50’s, oxygen, blanket, diaper approved by NASA and identity card.

Couples packs are available. International shipment is being planned. An emergency walker is also included. Each GeezerPack is also waterproof as there have been delays due to inclement weather.

The pack can be used at the destination as a temporary home. It fits through most doorways and  stairways. It is clearly marked “THIS SIDE UP!

We have shipped over 1000 seniors without a complaint.

Each GeeserPack is barcoded and you can track your loved one on your home computer or smart phone. Each GeezerPack is delivered to your address by two strong men and a truck. For a slight additional fee they will help rearrange your furniture. The box and chair  are yours to keep.

Please carefully wrap your senior as sometimes the GeezerPack gets dropped or falls.

Frequent shipper cards available. Every 10th shipment is free. Get your card punched by the driver.

And, when you think about it; this is not so far-fetched. Think of all the astronauts sent into space and to the moon. Why can’t old people travel the same way?

DON’T DELAY, SHIP YOUR SENIOR TODAY!

THINK OLD!


GENEALOGY RESEARCH IN LARGO, FL LIBRARY – ROOTS FOR SENIORS

A library is an old person’s salvation on a vacation, at home or when visiting younger family members who work. It provides books to buy, a cafe for coffee and sandwiches, magazines, free internet access, classes and all sorts of free information. It is frequently open on Sunday and always during the week.

The Largo Public Library is the designated center for genealogical research  for Pinellas, County Florida. This is where  the Pinellas Genealogy Society meets. There is usually something going on.

Like many genealogical libraries. Largo is a wealth of information.There are free computers, free wi-fi and thousands of books that can be used for genealogical research.

The Pinellas County Genealogical Society meets here and sponsors lectures and help with research. There are always a few members hanging around who are happy to help you.

At the main desk you can buy genealogical forms including a 15 generation form for $2. You can make copies and there is a librarian ready to help you with any problem.

You can buy a USB flash drive for $5 and by paying $1 for a day pass you can access Ancestory.com with its infinite source of genealogical information.

The library also subscribes to about a dozen genealogy related magazines that you didn’t even know existed.

Largo is only one example. Many libraries  have a genealogy section; usually run by the city or state genealogical society. In Albuquerque it covers the whole second floor of the main library and includes, copiers, thousands of books from every state, newspaper files, computer access and helpful members of the staff and the Albuquerque Genealogical Society.

In other places, Google: library+name of city+genealogy,

So, Google:    library+Largo, FL+genealogy  and you get:

      City of Largo, Florida | Genealogy
      www.largo.com › City Departments › Largo Public Library
      The Largo Public Library has been designated as the center for genealogical research for the Pinellas Public Library   

In Albuquerque, New Mexico,

Google: library+Albuquerque, NM and you would get:

       www.abqgen.swnet.com/
       The Genealogy Center in the Albuquerque Main Library at 501 Copper, NW is … PO Box 25512, Albuquerque, New Mexico.

You can discover the secrets of your family’s past. You hopefully will discover a number of scandalous stories to tell your friends and grandchildren. You will be more interesting than if you just talk about the last TV show you saw or about how terrible it is to grow old. You will also meet some interesting new (“old”)  people.

With your genealogy as a base, you have a focus for new trips, your own living museums where you and your ancestors are the stars. You can visit the asylum where your great-great grandmother spent most of her life. Most old people aren’t really too interesting, and don’t seem to have much purpose. Don’t be one of those. Explore your  past.

You can also check out old death certificates and find out what your ancestors died from; hopefully, few of them were shot by jealous spouses.

THINK OLD!

 

 

 

 

 


LIBRARIES – A Necessary Stop On Any geezerTrip!

If you travel, you need to stop at a library wherever you are. Libraries serve senior travelers. This is written from the Main Branch of the Smithtown, NY Public Library. Yesterday, I was at the Huntington Station, NY Public Library.

There is free WiFi. You can sit for hours and write about your trip without being disturbed. And, you can do it from  10 in the morning to 9 at night; and, frequently on Saturdays and Sundays. There are also computers  and copying machines. If you have your own i-pad you can access the library WiFi.

There are magazines and comfortable chairs. There are toilets, drinking fountains and parking.

There is local information so you can see what is happening where you are.

At Smithtown Library, pick up a copy of the monthly “Inside Your Library.”  For example, in April 2015, I can attend an Estate Planning Seminar,  a Seminar on “Affordable Home Buying on Long Island,” yoga, tax prep, numerous book discussion groups, movies, history lectures, a writer’s group, exhibits, and cooking classes. The Cinco de Mayo, South of the Border Cooking class, is today for $5.00 and you get to sample the results.

All the libraries that I have been in have used book sales. Here you can get paperbacks for 50 cents and hardbound books for $1.00. There are also magazines and CD’s. When traveling, you can pick up a half-dozen books, read them and donate them when you are finished.

Most libraries also have genealogical information and ties to the local historical societies. If you want to know who you are and where you came from, check out the library. In Albuquerque Public Library Main Branch, the entire second floor is devoted to genealogy, complete with thousands of books and a dozen computers that you can use for free. You can even access Ancestory.com for free within the library. And, the librarians who work the second floor are knowledgeable on researching your ancestors. An added plus is that members of the NM Genealogical Society and The Albuquerque Genealogy Society hang out there and love to help a newcomer find a person in their past.

If you have grandchildren, take a look at what libraries offer for kids. Story telling, classes, etc. If you are going to entertain a five-year old, the library is a great place.

If you travel, and even if you don’t, a library is worth a visit; especially if you want to find out about your past or if you are looking for interesting places to visit in your present.

Finally, old people have problems. They are frequently afraid to seek advice. No one wants to admit to driving problems or the possibility of cancer. A library, especially an out-of-town one, is a good place to check out your problem anonymously. You might attend a seminar on cancer; or hearing problems; or financial planning. Find out. Ask the librarian for books/information on “your problem,” and do a little research where no one knows you.

 


BODY DONATION – No box for the geezer!

Skip the box! Choose body donation!

Not only are more people living longer; their  older dying age requires more old bodies for medical schools and their budding gerontologists. Body donation is the key; not, medical students going out late at night to source their own cadaver, as was the custom 100 years ago.

The frugal senior will explore interesting alternatives to funeral homes.

A funeral can cost  $10,000; cremation can cost $2000; even green burial can cost $1000 and all these require more hassle than you want to force on your heirs.

Think body donation; it costs nothing and you can focus on a convenient and cheap memorial service at a convenient time and place.

See the Uniform Anatomical Gift Act and the states in which it has been adopted.

The best bet may be a medical school body donation. Medical students have become quite civilized. You will not be the butt of their jokes and what was you will be treated with respect. It will be your last good deed.

If you are in New Mexico, contact the University of New Mexico. In other states search the medical school website.

The Mayo Clinic says you are never too old to donate your body;  and they will provide you with a copy of their donation form. Click on Mayo Clinic Form.

Your driver’s license may authorize organ donations – make sure this does not conflict with your body donation to a medical school. Medical students need all of you, not just the left-overs.

Carry medical school contact numbers with you. In fact, tape the name and number on the back of your driver’s license.

Have the cremains, after the medical school is through with you, put in a plastic bag; that way they will be around for a thousand years.

Check these two cites:

https://www.mayoclinic.org/body-donation/making-donation

https://hsc.unm.edu/school-of-medicine/cell-biology-physiology/anatomical-donation-program.html

THIINK OLD!


Albuquerque Historical Society Walking Tour!

In July, 2019, I took a walking tour of downtown Albuquerque, NM led by one of 14 volunteers of the Albuquerque Historical Society. The tour lasted 2 hours and covered “new town” Albuquerque and focused on buildings and stories along a 10 block length of Central Ave. (formerly Railroad Avenue)

The tour was primarily of buildings built in the late 1800’s and early 1900’s.

 

Janet, the tour guide was well informed, and had a notebook of historical photos. Fifteen buildings were singled out as unique in some way.

The tour starts at the site of the old Alvardo hotel, destroyed in the 1960’s and then rebuilt decades later as a transportation center for Amtrak, the RailRunner, and local and national busses.

The city tickets you for parking on Saturday on the street, so use a parking lot to avoid a $20 ticket.

A highlht of the trip is Conrad Hilton’s fourth Hotel, constructed in 1939. Hilton was born in nearby San Antonio, New Mexico.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Google Walking and the name of the city that you are visiting. Look for “free.” Check out the local historical society for information on tours and lectures.

Walking tours are, good for exercise, for meeting new people, and for keeping your old mind active.

You can find them in virtually any large city in the world.

See tripadvisor.com for walking tour ideas. Search Albuquerque, or the name of any town.

THINK OLD! TRAVEL MORE!

 

 


TRAIN TO TUCSON – alternative travel for an old man!

 

One of the main fears that old people have is losing their driving options. Most of us are addicted to cars. We have been  driving the 450 miles from our home in Albuquerque to see our grandchildren in Tucson for years; but, since I turned 79, I am rethinking my driving before someone else rethinks it for me. Our sons watch us…

We were making the trip over two days, with a nice stop and a visit to the hot springs spa at Sierra Grande Lodge  in Truth or Consequences, NM; however, now we need to think a bit further out. My no-driving future may be closer than I think. Time to experiment with a few alternatives.

Last week, we drove to El Paso; a straight 270 mile shot on I-25. We took the Amtrak from El Paso to Tucson. Cost $50 each, each way. The train was 3 hours late out of El Paso, but except for the usual stress that old people feel about sitting around in a train station, not a problem. Coming back we got into  El Paso 45 minutes early, which meant that we could drive back to Albuquerque before dark. Since it was Saturday afternoon, there was not much  traffic on the freeway. Dark and large trucks worry old people.

Our son met us in Tucson and the next morning we rented a car from Enterprise, who picked us up. Thus we had a car in Tucson. We turned it in on Friday at 5 and got a ride to the train station the next morning. You can save a bit of money if you go through Costco Travel.

The coach train seats were great; much better than coach airline seats.

The food was questionable. Take a look at the train menu. Next time, a picnic lunch.

Boarding was a snap. We lined up, the conductor scanned our e-tickets and gave us a paper slip with our seat numbers. We had to climb a narrow stair-case to the upper level, but, you can’t have everything when you are old. No elevator.

The train, including the bathrooms, was clean.

The observation car was comfortable with tables; and, many people with laptops, cell phones and card games.

There were electrical outlets, but no wi-fi on the Southwestern Trains. Since I am addicted to my blog, I use a personal hotspot from T-mobile; (I pay $5 extra a month for extra gigabytes and T-mobile works all over the world.)

Note that cell phone reception is not the best between Lordsburg NM and Tuson, but…

The train was not crowded; about 20 % full.

You share tables in the dining car. We were seated with an interestig man from the Phillipines who was seeing the world. He started out working on Costa Cruise Ships, heard about truck driving in the US, and came here. He is an American Citizen and drives refrigerated trucks across the US. He was going to New Orleans to pick up his car, then to Chicago to start a new truck driving job in the Northeastern part of the US. He has no overhead and plans to return to the Phillipines after Australia and New Zealand

He is also working on a blog, but has not yet published it.

In El Paso, we parked in a secure garage for $10 per day. It was about 2 blocks from the train station and a block from the bus station. It is manned 24 hours a day.

The El Paso train station is an imposing old building; but not marked in any way. So  we drove around it a few times and ended up back on the freeway before someone pointed it out. Downtown El Paso is confusing. Next time we will recognize the train station. Experience works, even in old age.

The train station is large, not used much: one passenger train a day in each direction. It has vending machines, one of which takes your money and does not vend; but, there is a warning sign. All the usual junk food. Nothing healthy. Cookies, candies and chips. No restaurants close by.

Three unplanned hours of waiting.

The net result: when we really can’t drive  we can take the train, even though it will mean a bus ride from Albuquerque to El Paso, which can be arranged through Amtrak. You have to walk from one station to the other.

Since there are no longer any non-stop flights from Albuquerque to Tucson, we are considering flying through Las Vegas.

Another option that I will have to try alone, since my wife is not interested, is the bus to Tucson. It is reasonable, goes through Phoenix and leaves and arrives at decent hours, albeit 12 hours apart.

The lesson learned is that I have several relatively safe options to get to Tucson; all of which I will try before I have to use them. Even at my age I can figure out what to do now that I have done it.

We can adapt to our age.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

You should check out alternate means of travel.

THINK OLD!   TRAVEL MORE!